Archives for April 2015

Why Canned Food Drives Alone Won’t Solve America’s Hunger Crisis

DSC_5982When it comes to hunger in the United States, we’re faced with some scary statistics: according to a 2014 study by Feeding America, 49.1 million Americans lived in food insecure households in 2013. And 20 percent of those households included children.

While approximately 100 million pounds of food is donated to Feeding America food banks each year via canned food drives, these items alone won’t solve the issue of hunger that so many Americans face. Tight budgets, limited volunteers, finite donations, and the short turnarounds required between receiving fresh foods and distributing them to families in need can be challenges in addressing the issue of hunger – and doing so with nutrient-rich foods.

More at:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/08/how-to-solve-americas-hunger-crisis-feeding-america_n_6436642.html

Regional Food Bank Seeks Executive Director

The Second Harvest Food Bank of Southeast N.C. is looking for a new executive director. See more details at:http://www.ccap-inc.org/hr.php

While U.S. Economy Improves, Food Insecurity Lingers

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National Geographic April 16,  by April Fulton

Dawn Pierce of Boise, Idaho, still remembers the time her colleagues suggested a potluck lunch at work. “I called in sick that day because I couldn’t bring anything,” she tells The Plate. “I couldn’t afford it. I was so embarrassed.”

Pierce was a paralegal and a single mom who often found herself scrambling for her family’s next meal, but she kept up appearances. When she was laid off in 2010, she knew she really needed help. More at:

http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/16/while-u-s-economy-improves-food-insecurity-lingers/

Working, but Needing Public Assistance Anyway

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NY Times   PATRICIA COHEN  APRIL 12, 2015

A home health care worker in Durham, N.C.; a McDonald’s cashier in Chicago; a bank teller in New York; an adjunct professor in Maywood, Ill. They are all evidence of an improving economy, because they are working and not among the steadily declining ranks of the unemployed.

Yet these same people also are on public assistance — relying on food stamps, Medicaid or other stretches of the safety net to help cover basic expenses when their paychecks come up short.

And they are not alone. Nearly three-quarters of the people helped by programs geared to the poor are members of a family headed by a worker, according to a new study by the Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education at the University of California. As a result, taxpayers are providing not only support to the poor but also, in effect, a huge subsidy for employers of low-wage workers, from giants like McDonald’s and Walmart to mom-and-pop businesses. More at

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/13/business/economy/working-but-needing-public-assistance-anyway.html?_r=0